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December 01, 2008

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Don't Eat Anything that Requires A Label

So, basically, the Madhava Agave is still 90% fructose (man-made sugar) because an enzyme is added to the process- whether its vegan or not- its not, then, Raw. Right? And fructose isn't really good for anyone. Plus, reducing our carbon footprint means eating close to home, why must we always look to the most exotic super food to cure our obesity, when the answer is on our doorstep- Moderation.

Shiva Bliss

Way to go Craig! You tell em. I knew that this article was just an attack and assault dog from the moment I saw it. I have been studying about
AGAVE for a year now, and know only too well from my own experience how wonderful it is. Many people who do the Master Cleanser for weight loss use maple syrup in the lemonade, but I have found that Agave makes one loose weight much faster, and is way more cost effective than the Grade B maple syrup. There are organic raw dark amber ones that look just like maple syrup! They are wonderful to have while on Master Cleanser. Get the good stuff. It pays to be heatlhy.

penis size

More & more people know that Blogs are good for every one where we can get more knowledge --- nice job keep it up !!!

nancy

I was ready to order a case of Volcanic Agave,Now I'm very confused.

Did Mr.Bianchi reply to Craig Gerbore statement in this article?

More from the tooth sop blog on agave

Hi Karen,

The wildnerness family naturals agave is made by Nekutli.

"Traditionally, Agave syrup is a very dark, thick liquid with a characteristic smell and strong flavor. It is dark because, during the evaporating process, some of the sugars caramelize and Maillard reactions occur causing a cross-linking between sugars and amino acids. These reactions occur because high temperatures are used to evaporate the aguamiel. (>90 °C, 194 °F). The strong flavor and aroma of traditional agave syrup is caused by the high concentration of salts (calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, etc.). The syrup is high in fructose and dextrose because the larger carbohydrates undergo a thermal hydrolysis into the monosaccharides."

Traditional agave (agua miel) is made by boiling (not available in US), their agave is made by enzyme hydrolysis, it turns the natural sugar's into fructose, a synthetic sugar.

"Wilderness Family Naturals' Raw Agave Nectar is not heated. You will find it very light in color and extremely mild tasting. Absolutely no carmelization or cross linking of sugars and proteins occurs during the process. It is sent to the enzymatic reactor. In this tank, a natural enzyme is added to the sugars to break them down into fructose and dextrose."

Synthetically made enzymes convert unsweet substances into refined fructose, a sweetener linked with many diseases. Real sweetener from agave plants, (Agua Miel) not available in the US, has like they say, a strong flavor. This is a new sweetener, refined fructose, and it is not safe to consume.

Rami

~~~~~~~~~~

This is the second part of the email Rami sent me (I have bolded and italicized Rami's comments)

On Tue, Dec 2, 2008 at 9:34 PM, Ramiel Nagel wrote:
Hi Karen,

I am glad you distributed my article, but be aware that these people you are saying know something are completely ignorant.

It says right on this page http://www.wildernessfamilynaturals.com/agave.htm
Fructose 70-75%. This is the stuff that give lab rats disease.

"First, my understanding is the term levulose is synonymous with
fructose. "

Levulose is not the same as fructose. Levulose is recognized by the body, fructose is not. Fructose is the reverse isermization of levulose.

"Levulose is metabolized in the liver and its uptake is not regulated by insulin."

Fructose, not levulose is metabolized in the liver because it's poisonous. Liver processes poisons.

"Third, regarding Volcanic blue agave nectar, claims are made for it
stating it is "diabetic friendly" based on its measured glycemic index. "

The government does not approve this term, and it is NOT diabetic friendly. High fructose is highly dangerous to diabetics.

"Volcanic blue agave syrup is that it provides a long lasting source of energy with no
side effects except moderate appetite suppression."

This is high fructose agave syrup. It's not better nor safer than high fructose corn syrup. Stay away from this product if you want to be healthy.

Rami

On Tue, Dec 2, 2008 at 4:58 PM, Karen Adler, Tooth Soap® Support Team wrote:
Dear Ramiel,

Rami Nagel's article on Agave has proven to be
controversial, to say the least, and with all things
there are more opinions. So here we go...

I received the following letter today in favor
of Blue Agave Nectar:

http://tinyurl.com/69uuxs

More info in favor of this nectar is found at:
http://www.wildernessfamilynaturals.com/agave.htm

Happy SWEET reading!

Karen Adler
Tooth Soap® Support GREEN Team

Raw Chef Dan

Last Call For Agave Controversy

The wildnerness family naturals agave is made by Nekutli.

"Traditionally, Agave syrup is a very dark, thick liquid with a characteristic smell and strong flavor. It is dark because, during the evaporating process, some of the sugars caramelize and Maillard reactions occur causing a cross-linking between sugars and amino acids. These reactions occur because high temperatures are used to evaporate the aguamiel. (>90 °C, 194 °F). The strong flavor and aroma of traditional agave syrup is caused by the high concentration of salts (calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, etc.). The syrup is high in fructose and dextrose because the larger carbohydrates undergo a thermal hydrolysis into the monosaccharides."

Traditional agave (agua miel) is made by boiling (not available in US), their agave is made by enzyme hydrolysis, it turns the natural sugar's into fructose, a synthetic sugar.

"Wilderness Family Naturals' Raw Agave Nectar is not heated. You will find it very light in color and extremely mild tasting. Absolutely no carmelization or cross linking of sugars and proteins occurs during the process. It is sent to the enzymatic reactor. In this tank, a natural enzyme is added to the sugars to break them down into fructose and dextrose."

Synthetically made enzymes convert unsweet substances into refined fructose, a sweetener linked with many diseases. Real sweetener from agave plants, (Agua Miel) not available in the US, has like they say, a strong flavor. This is a new sweetener, refined fructose, and it is not safe to consume.

Rami

~~~~~~~~~~

This is the second part of the email Rami sent me (I have bolded and italicized Rami's comments)

On Tue, Dec 2, 2008 at 9:34 PM, Ramiel Nagel wrote:
Hi Karen,

I am glad you distributed my article, but be aware that these people you are saying know something are completely ignorant.

It says right on this page http://www.wildernessfamilynaturals.com/agave.htm
Fructose 70-75%. This is the stuff that give lab rats disease.

"First, my understanding is the term levulose is synonymous with
fructose. "

Levulose is not the same as fructose. Levulose is recognized by the body, fructose is not. Fructose is the reverse isermization of levulose.

"Levulose is metabolized in the liver and its uptake is not regulated by insulin."

Fructose, not levulose is metabolized in the liver because it's poisonous. Liver processes poisons.

"Third, regarding Volcanic blue agave nectar, claims are made for it
stating it is "diabetic friendly" based on its measured glycemic index. "

The government does not approve this term, and it is NOT diabetic friendly. High fructose is highly dangerous to diabetics.

"Volcanic blue agave syrup is that it provides a long lasting source of energy with no
side effects except moderate appetite suppression."

This is high fructose agave syrup. It's not better nor safer than high fructose corn syrup. Stay away from this product if you want to be healthy.

Rami

Deb Schiff

Hi Dan,

I've been in email correspondence with the President of Madhava, who has crafted the following response to the article reprinted above:

Response to Rami Nagel’s article
By Craig Gerbore, President of Madhava

In response, I must first point out that Mr. Nagel’s article is based on the view of a sole individual, Russ Bianchi. I suppose we should thank Mr. Bianchi for pointing out some issues that may have contributed to Iidea’s (the initial manufacturer of blue agave nectar) demise from the market, however I want to be clear, this is not about Madhava or our agave nectar. Once a dominant supplier, as of this past summer Iidea is no longer a major supplier in the agave syrup business. The distributors using them as a supplier have quietly switched to newly formed blue agave companies for their supply. Madhava has always worked exclusively with Nekutli, the producer of agave nectar from the agave salmiana variety, a very different variety of the agave.

However, there is no mention of our agave nectar from salmiana in the article, nor of the differences in the plant, the collection and production of our product. So, the author has blurred the line with his all encompassing attack on blue agave nectar, by his failure to present complete information on the subject of agave nectars. For what purpose was this article written? If it were to educate the public, I think it would be balanced and include all the information available. With the errors and misstatements and half-truths, I don’t think this article is about education, it is an all out shotgun attack.
I believe Mr. Bianchi, presented as the sole authority on agave nectar, was initially introduced to Iidea’s blue agave syrup product on their entry to the market in the late 90’s. At that time, Iidea was promoting a 90% fructose agave syrup. This is what I believe Mr. Bianchi is referring to. Unfortunately, he ignores the fact that this is not the agave sold on the market today, nor is it representative of Madhava’s product. In fact Mr. Bianchi has never even acknowledged the existence of our agave nectar from the salmiana variety. So, all his comments are apparently based on his experience with Iidea’s product, but I find ourselves caught in the crossfire.

In their zestful attack against the blue agave syrup he was introduced to initially, Mr.’s Bianchi and Nagel have also made comments which reflect on agave nectar generally. As such, I take issue with several of their statements and claims and want to clarify some things as regards Madhava’s Agave Nectar from agave salmiana.
Their discussion of the processing of agave nectar is in no way reflective of how Madhava’s agave nectar is produced. There are three ways to convert complex sugars into a simple sugar sweetener such as agave syrup. It can be done thermally, chemically, or enzymatically as ours is. There are no chemicals whatsoever involved in the production of Madhava’s agave nectar from agave salmiana, nor is it cooked. Our agave is subject only to low temperatures during the evaporation of excess water from the juice.

The author states “The principal constituent of the agave is starch, such as what is found in corn or rice.”
This statement, which is the foundation of much of their argument comparing agave nectar to corn syrup, has no basis in scientific fact, THERE IS NO STARCH IN THE AGAVE.

How can the author be so mistaken on this statement which is central to his attack?
All plants store energy in one of two ways, as starches or fructans. All agave plants create fructans, not starches, as energy storing means.

Agave plants have inulin, not starch. From Wikipedia: Inulins are a group of naturally occurring polysaccharides produced by many types of plants. They belong to a class of fibers know as fructans. Inulin is used by some plants as a means of storing energy and it typically found in roots or rhizomes. Most plants which synthesize and store inulin do not store other materials such as starch.

There is no starch in either variety of agave, and agave nectar is not from starch as the author and Mr. Bianchi claim. They have tried very hard to propagandize the public with a false fact, either by design, or ignorance, for which there would be no excuse.

Such an error of fact certainly casts doubt on the validity of the rest of Nagel’s article, as the lack of depth of his research has to be apparent to all. Really, he is just regurgitating the singular views of Mr. Bianchi.

I personally spoke with the author during
his “research”, as did at least one other in the industry. He chose not to include one word of the information given him by us, which I will repeat below, and failed to make any distinction between Madhava’s Nekutli agave nectar from salmiana and that from the blue agave plant. He only mentions blue agave. The plants differ, the locations differ, the methods and production differ greatly. The information we gave him did not fit his purpose and so was omitted in favor of a generalized attack.

Madhava’s source is exclusively agave salmiana. If you haven’t already reviewed our site at www.madhavasagave.com , you will find background information there. Briefly though, the native people supplying the juice collect it from the live plant, by hand, twice daily. There is no heat involved in the removal. The juice is immediately brought to the facility to remove the excess water. The juice is approx 50% water, and will ferment rapidly if left standing. It is during the removal of the moisture that the only heat is applied. The juice is evaporated and moisture removed in a vacuum evaporator. The vacuum enables the moisture to be withdrawn at low temperatures. The temp is closely controlled. Subsequently, our agave is handled and packaged at room temperatures. No other heat is applied. And, rather than convert the complex sugars of the juice thermally, we use gentle enzymatic action. Just as a bee introduces an enzyme to flower nectar to make honey, we introduce an organic vegan enzyme for the same purpose. The technical term for the conversion of complex sugars into their simple sugar components is hydrolysis. Inulin is a fructan which is hydrolyzed into the simple sugars composing agave nectar, fructose and glucose. Honey is composed of the same simple sugars.
The blue agave plant is harvested and the blue agave nectar is produced by a completely different method. I will have to leave it to the blue agave nectar sellers to comment on the production themselves. While I know of it, I have not witnessed it as I have Nekutli’s. Unlike the author, I won’t comment publicly on something I cannot verify.

To clarify further on another claim, “Agave Nectar as a final product is mostly chemically refined fructose”. As regards Madhava’s agave nectar, there are no chemicals involved in our production whatsoever. The sugars in our agave nectar come from the breakdown of the inulin molecule through the introduction of the enzyme to break apart that molecule. It is in no way chemically refined, there are no chemicals involved in any part of the production or packaging process. Our agave nectar is refined only in as much as the excess moisture is removed from the juice of the plant.

“HFCS is made with GM enzymes”. Bianchi’s states “they (agave and corn syrup) are indeed made the same way” This is another false assertion as regards Madhava’s agave nectar at least. Our agave nectar is certainly and clearly not made the same way as corn syrup. There is no starch in our agave. There are no chemicals, no refinement beyond the evaporation of water. And, there are no GMO’s whatsoever. The agave salmiana has never been subject to this and the enzyme is a natural, non GM organic, vegan enzyme.

Other points regarding fructose apply to sugars in general and are a consumption, or overconsumption issue. Certainly consuming large amounts of sweeteners of any kind will be detrimental to one’s health. Suggesting fructose could cause health issues when concentrated amounts are eaten is a statement which should really apply to the overconsumption issue. The information the author links to agave nectar is the result of megadose testing of pure clinical fructose. Not the same thing as normal daily use of agave nectar in the course of our meals.

The antisweetener advocates just have to admit that it is the overconsumption of sugars that is the problem. Used in moderation, sugars serve a purpose, to make other foods and beverages more palatable. Imagine a world without sweeteners if you can. Affinity for sweet taste is a human trait that most want to satisfy. For those who use sweeteners, there are limited choices available and many choose agave for its particular attributes. It is a good choice. Agave’s neutral flavor suits the purpose. It is in fact low glycemic, organically certified and non allergenic. Many with diabetes and other special diets find it suitable for their use where other sweeteners are not. It’s easy to use and you can use less.

While it remains up to the individual to maintain balance in their diet and monitor their overall consumption of sweets, agave nectar does have advantages over other sweeteners and that is why it has become so popular and received so much attention today.

Footnote: While Bianchi’s “globally recognized” company doesn’t seem to have a website of their own, a web check finds they have a listing in several service directories. Listed are many services his company provides, including Ingredient Brokers! Digging further, I find products include oligosaccharides, which are complex sugars. Among the industry groups they are a member of is the Association of Candy Technologists, an industry which obviously involves sugars and sweeteners. So, Russ Bianchi is not an independent party concerned with the health food industry, he has ties to sweeteners of his own.
As regards Mr. Nagel, I wonder why he makes such an effort to attack, and base it on scientifically incorrect information and one man’s claims. The answer must be, he wasn’t looking for the truth of the matter. He only serves as Bianchi’s attack dog in the effort to blunt agave nectars success.
Craig Gerbore has operated Madhava since shortly after graduation from the Univ. of Colorado with a degree in Small Business in 1975. Madhava remains a small, accessible company and Craig makes a point of responding to inquiries himself on a daily basis. Always glad to discuss agave and interested in your comments, Craig remains available at 800-530-2900.

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